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dc.contributor.authorMartin, Kyle
dc.contributor.otherTartu Ülikool. Filosoofiateaduskondet
dc.contributor.otherTartu Ülikool. Filosoofia osakondet
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-02T13:11:39Z
dc.date.available2017-06-02T13:11:39Z
dc.date.issued2017-05
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10062/56489
dc.description.abstractThis thesis aims at achieving working definitions of terrorism and violence and to review the actions and political and legal considerations that the United States has made with the intention of arguing that there are few, if any, features that legitimize the conflict as a just war under philosophical and ethical considerations of the term, and is instead a series of deliberate acts of state terrorism and human rights abuses. Then lastly to apply post-colonial theory to the history and development of militarized action by the natives occupying the Middle East region. In short, concentration is on the broader circumstance of the War on Terror.en
dc.language.isoengen
dc.publisherTartu Ülikoolet
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rightsopenAccesset
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectterrorismen
dc.subjectviolenceen
dc.subjectwaren
dc.subject.othermagistritöödet
dc.titleRedefining the War on Terroren
dc.typeThesisen


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International