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dc.contributor"European Union (EU)" and "Horizon 2020"
dc.contributor.authorMakarychev, Andrey
dc.date.accessioned2018-04-17T13:56:33Z
dc.date.available2018-04-17T13:56:33Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10062/59745
dc.description.abstractThe paper applies the concept of biopolitics to the analysis of Russia's relations with Georgia. It highlights the centrality of Orthodoxy for Russia's "soft power" and religious diplomacy.en
dc.language.isoenget
dc.publisherTbilisi: Georgian Institute of Politics.et
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/691818///UPTAKEet
dc.relation.ispartofAnsgar Jödicke, Kornely Kakachia (Ed.). Religion and Soft Power in South Caucasus: Policy Perspective (7-15)
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccess
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/closedAccesset
dc.subjectBiopoliticsen
dc.subjectbiopoweren
dc.subjectconservatismen
dc.subjectreligionen
dc.subjectbiopoliitikaet
dc.subjectbiovõimet
dc.subjectkonservatismet
dc.subjectreligioonet
dc.titleBiopolitical conservatism and “pastoral power”: a Russia – Georgia meeting point.en
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/bookPartet


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