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dc.contributor"European Union (EU)" and "Horizon 2020"
dc.contributor.authorBerg, Eiki
dc.contributor.authorKilp, Alar
dc.date.accessioned2019-02-25T13:12:04Z
dc.date.available2019-02-25T13:12:04Z
dc.date.issued2018
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10062/63378
dc.description.abstractThe article analyzes how Azerbaijan, Armenia and Georgia react to the EU’s soft power, which is mainly based on its human rights policy including the freedom of religion and the promotion of pluralism. The EU has limited soft power in the South Caucasus. It remains attractive but only to a relative degree. The EU’s normative power is challenged by conservative value orientations which are backed up by religious institutions and politicians seeking to maximize their political gains.et
dc.language.isoenget
dc.publisherLondon, New York: Routledgeet
dc.relationinfo:eu-repo/grantAgreement/EC/H2020/691818///UPTAKEet
dc.relation.ispartofAnsgar Jödicke (Ed.). Religion and Soft Power in the South Caucasus (191−214)
dc.rightsinfo:eu-repo/semantics/embargoedAccesset
dc.subjectEuropean Unionet
dc.subjectnormative poweret
dc.subjectsoft poweret
dc.subjectreligion and politicset
dc.subjectSouth Caucasuset
dc.subjectEuroopa Liitet
dc.subjectnormatiivne jõudet
dc.subjectpehme jõudet
dc.subjectreligioon ja poliitikaet
dc.subjectLõuna-Kaukaasiaet
dc.titleFace to face with conservative religious values: Assessing the EU's normative impact in the South Caucasuset
dc.typeinfo:eu-repo/semantics/articleet


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