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dc.contributor.advisorKattago, Siobhan, juhendajaet
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Jared
dc.contributor.otherTartu Ülikool. Humanitaarteaduste ja kunstide valdkondet
dc.contributor.otherTartu Ülikool. Filosoofia osakondet
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-29T08:53:43Z
dc.date.available2022-06-29T08:53:43Z
dc.date.issued2022
dc.identifier.other20.03.01 SMI 01
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10062/82864
dc.description.abstractThis thesis examines how digital technology has created an individualized environment of understanding which threatens genuine value creation in an individual and collective. Whereas television, through machination of information mediums in the 1960s, created a hyperreality of understanding at the macro level, society, digital technology operates on the micro level, the individual. The development and use of digital technology, such as social media or online entertainment content, has created an understanding in users which appears to be active nihilism, but is in actuality passive nihilism, and perhaps even creating Digital Last Men.en
dc.description.urihttps://www.ester.ee/record=b5507760et
dc.language.isoenget
dc.publisherTartu Ülikoolet
dc.rightsopenAccesset
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/*
dc.subjectphilosophyen
dc.subjecttechnologyen
dc.subject.othermagistritöödet
dc.subject.otherfilosoofiaet
dc.subject.othertehnoloogiaet
dc.titleOn how God became pocket-sized: digital machination's challenge to active nihilismen
dc.typeThesiset


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